Difference between revisions of "TR-08-13"

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(Preface pages and TOC of TR-08-13)
 
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DESTROY THIS REPORT WHEN NO LONGER NEEDED. DO NOT RETURN IT TO THE ORIGINATOR.<br>
 
DESTROY THIS REPORT WHEN NO LONGER NEEDED. DO NOT RETURN IT TO THE ORIGINATOR.<br>
 
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{|border="0" cellspacing="2" width="100%"
 
{|border="0" cellspacing="2" width="100%"
 
|Figures and Tables
 
|Figures and Tables
|align = "right" colspan = "3"|v
+
||&nbsp;
 +
|align = "right"|v
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|Preface
 
|Preface
|align = "right" colspan = "3"|ix
+
||&nbsp;
 +
|align = "right"|ix
 +
|}
  
|-
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{|border="0" cellspacing="2" width="100%"
|colspan = "2"|'''1
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|'''1'''
|''''''Introduction
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||'''Introduction'''
|align = "right"|1'''
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||'''1'''
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
|Overview
+
||Overview
 
|align = "right"|1
 
|align = "right"|1
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;
|Review of wave processes at coastal inlets  
+
||Review of wave processes at coastal inlets  
 
|align = "right"|2
 
|align = "right"|2
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;
|New features added to CMS-Wave
+
||New features added to CMS-Wave
 
|align = "right"|7
 
|align = "right"|7
 +
|}
  
|-
+
{|border="0" cellspacing="2" width="100%"
|colspan = "2"|'''2
+
|'''2'''
|Model Description
+
||'''Model Description'''
|align = "right"|9'''
+
||'''9'''
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Wave-action balance equation with diffraction
 
|Wave-action balance equation with diffraction
 
|align = "right"|9
 
|align = "right"|9
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Wave diffraction
 
|Wave diffraction
 
|align = "right"|9
 
|align = "right"|9
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Wave-current interaction
 
|Wave-current interaction
 
|align = "right"|10
 
|align = "right"|10
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Wave reflection
 
|Wave reflection
 
|align = "right"|11
 
|align = "right"|11
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Wave breaking formulas
 
|Wave breaking formulas
 
|align = "right"|12
 
|align = "right"|12
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|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Extended Goda formula
|Extended Goda formula
 
 
|align = "right"|13
 
|align = "right"|13
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Extended Miche formula
|Extended Miche formula
 
 
|align = "right"|14
 
|align = "right"|14
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Battjes and Janssen formula
|Battjes and Janssen formula
 
 
|align = "right"|15
 
|align = "right"|15
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Chawla and Kirby formula
|Chawla and Kirby formula
 
 
|align = "right"|16
 
|align = "right"|16
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Wind forcing and whitecapping dissipation
 
|Wind forcing and whitecapping dissipation
 
|align = "right"|16
 
|align = "right"|16
  
 
|-
 
|-
|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Wind input function
|Wind input function
 
 
|align = "right"|16
 
|align = "right"|16
  
 
|-
 
|-
|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
||&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Whitecapping dissipation function
|Whitecapping dissipation function
 
 
|align = "right"|17
 
|align = "right"|17
  
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|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
 
|Wave generation with arbitrary wind direction
 
|Wave generation with arbitrary wind direction
|align = "right" colspan = "2"|18
+
|align = "right"|18
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
 
|Bottom friction loss
 
|Bottom friction loss
|align = "right" colspan = "2"|18
+
|align = "right"|18
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
 
|Wave runup
 
|Wave runup
|align = "right" colspan = "2"|19
+
|align = "right"|19
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
 
|Wave transmission and overtopping at structures
 
|Wave transmission and overtopping at structures
|align = "right" colspan = "2"|21
+
|align = "right"|21
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
 
|Grid nesting
 
|Grid nesting
|align = "right" colspan = "2"|21
+
|align = "right"|21
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
 
|Variable-rectangular-cell grid
 
|Variable-rectangular-cell grid
|align = "right" colspan = "2"|22
+
|align = "right"|22
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
 
|Non-linear wave-wave interaction
 
|Non-linear wave-wave interaction
|align = "right" colspan = "2"|22
+
|align = "right"|22
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
 
|Fast-mode calculation
 
|Fast-mode calculation
|align = "right" colspan = "2"|23
+
|align = "right"|23
 +
|}
  
|-
+
{|border="0" cellspacing="2" width="100%"
|colspan = "2"|'''3
+
|'''3'''
|CMS-Wave Interface
+
|'''CMS-Wave Interface'''
|align = "right"|24'''
+
|align = "right"|'''24'''
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|CMS-Wave files
 
|CMS-Wave files
 
|align = "right"|24
 
|align = "right"|24
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Components of CMS-Wave interface
 
|Components of CMS-Wave interface
 
|align = "right"|29
 
|align = "right"|29
 +
|}
  
|-
+
{|border="0" cellspacing="2" width="100%"
|colspan = "2"|'''4
+
|'''4'''
|Model Validation
+
|'''Model Validation'''
|align = "right"|42'''
+
|align = "right"|'''42'''
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Case 1: Wave shoaling and breaking around an idealized inlet
 
|Case 1: Wave shoaling and breaking around an idealized inlet
 
|align = "right"|42
 
|align = "right"|42
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Case 2: Waves breaking on plane beach
 
|Case 2: Waves breaking on plane beach
 
|align = "right"|49
 
|align = "right"|49
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Case 3: Wave runup on impermeable uniform slope
 
|Case 3: Wave runup on impermeable uniform slope
 
|align = "right"|50
 
|align = "right"|50
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Case 4: Wave diffraction at breakwater and breakwater gap
 
|Case 4: Wave diffraction at breakwater and breakwater gap
 
|align = "right"|54
 
|align = "right"|54
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Case 5: Wave generation in fetch-limited condition
 
|Case 5: Wave generation in fetch-limited condition
 
|align = "right"|60
 
|align = "right"|60
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Case 6: Wave generation in bays
 
|Case 6: Wave generation in bays
 
|align = "right"|61
 
|align = "right"|61
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Case 7: Large waves at Mouth of Columbia River
 
|Case 7: Large waves at Mouth of Columbia River
 
|align = "right"|67
 
|align = "right"|67
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Case 8: Wave transformation in fast mode and variable-rectangular-cell grid
 
|Case 8: Wave transformation in fast mode and variable-rectangular-cell grid
 
|align = "right"|74
 
|align = "right"|74
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Case 9: Wave transformation over complicated bathymetry with strong <br>nearshore current
 
|Case 9: Wave transformation over complicated bathymetry with strong <br>nearshore current
 
|align = "right"|79
 
|align = "right"|79
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|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Extended Miche formula
|Extended Miche formula
 
 
|align = "right"|81
 
|align = "right"|81
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Extended Goda formula
|Extended Goda formula
 
 
|align = "right"|84
 
|align = "right"|84
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Battjes and Jansen formula
|Battjes and Jansen formula
 
 
|align = "right"|87
 
|align = "right"|87
  
 
|-
 
|-
 
|&nbsp;
 
|&nbsp;
|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Chawla and Kirby formula
|Chawla and Kirby formula
 
 
|align = "right"|90
 
|align = "right"|90
 +
|}
  
|-
+
{|border="0" cellspacing="2" width="100%"
|colspan = "2"|'''5
+
|'''5'''
|Field Applications
+
|'''Field Applications'''
|align = "right"|96'''
+
|align = "right"|'''96'''
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Matagorda Bay
 
|Matagorda Bay
 
|align = "right"|96
 
|align = "right"|96
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Grays Harbor Entrance
 
|Grays Harbor Entrance
 
|align = "right"|99
 
|align = "right"|99
  
 
|-
 
|-
|colspan = "2"|&nbsp;
+
|&nbsp;
 
|Southeast Oahu coast
 
|Southeast Oahu coast
 
|align = "right"|106
 
|align = "right"|106
 +
|}
  
|-
+
{|border="0" cellspacing="2" width="100%"
|'''References
+
|'''References'''
|align = "right" colspan = "3"|111'''
+
|align = "right"|'''111'''
  
 
|-
 
|-
|'''Appendix A: CMA-Wave Input File Formats
+
|'''Appendix A: CMA-Wave Input File Formats'''
|align = "right" colspan = "3"|117'''
+
|align = "right"|'''117'''
  
 
|}
 
|}

Revision as of 21:32, 22 April 2009


Title page


ERDC/CHL TR-08-13    
    Coastal Inlets Research Program
CMS-Wave: A Nearshore Spectral Wave Processes Model for Coastal Inlets and Navigation Projects
Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory     Lihwa Lin, Zeki Demirbilek, Hajime Mase, Jinhai Zheng, and Fumihiko Yamada
August 2008
   
      Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


Coastal Inlets Research Program ERDC/CHL TR-08-13
August 2008
CMS-Wave: A Nearshore Spectral Wave Processes Model for Coastal Inlets and Navigation Projects
Lihwa Lin and Zeki Demirbilek

U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center

Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory
3909 Halls Ferry Road

Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199, USA

Hajime Mase

Disaster Prevention Research Institute
Kyoto University
Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011, JAPAN

Jinhai Zheng

Hohai University
Research Institute of Coastal and Ocean Engineering
1 Xikang Road, Nanjing, 210098, China

Fumihiko Yamada

Kumamato University
Graduate School of Science and Technology
2-39-1, Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555, JAPAN

Final report
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited
Prepared forU.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Washington, DC 20314-1000

Monitored byCoastal and Hydraulics Laboratory
U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center
3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199



Abstract: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) plans, designs, constructs, and maintains jetties, breakwaters, training structures, and other types of coastal structures in support of Federal navigation projects. By means of these structures, it is common to constrain currents that can scour navigation channels, stabilize the location of channels and entrances, and provide wave protection to vessels transiting through inlets and navigation channels. Numerical wave predictions are frequently sought to guide management decisions for designing or maintaining structures and inlet channels.

The Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP) of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL), in collaboration with two universities in Japan, has developed a spectral wave transformation numerical model to address needs of USACE navigation projects. The model is called CMS-Wave and is part of Coastal Modeling System (CMS) developed in the CIRP. The CMS is a suite of coupled models operated in the Surface-water Modeling System (SMS), which is an interactive and comprehensive graphical user interface environment for preparing model input, running models, and viewing and analyzing results. CMS-Wave is designed for accurate and reliable representation of wave processes affecting operation and maintenance of coastal inlet structures in navigation projects, as well as in risk and reliability assessment of shipping in inlets and harbors. Important wave processes at coastal inlets are diffraction, refraction, reflection, wave breaking, dissipation mechanisms, and the wave-current interaction. The effect of locally generated wind can also be significant during wave propagation at inlets.

This report provides information on CMS-Wave theory, numerical implementation, and SMS interface, and a set of examples demonstrating the model’s application. Examples given in this report demonstrate CMS-Wave applicability for storm-damage assessment, modification to jetties including jetty extensions, jetty breaching, addition of spurs to inlet jetties, and planning and design of nearshore reefs and barrier islands to protect beaches and promote navigation reliability.

DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.


DESTROY THIS REPORT WHEN NO LONGER NEEDED. DO NOT RETURN IT TO THE ORIGINATOR.


Contents

Figures and Tables   v
Preface   ix
1 Introduction 1
  Overview 1
  Review of wave processes at coastal inlets 2
  New features added to CMS-Wave 7
2 Model Description 9
  Wave-action balance equation with diffraction 9
  Wave diffraction 9
  Wave-current interaction 10
  Wave reflection 11
  Wave breaking formulas 12
      Extended Goda formula 13
      Extended Miche formula 14
      Battjes and Janssen formula 15
      Chawla and Kirby formula 16
  Wind forcing and whitecapping dissipation 16
      Wind input function 16
      Whitecapping dissipation function 17
  Wave generation with arbitrary wind direction 18
  Bottom friction loss 18
  Wave runup 19
  Wave transmission and overtopping at structures 21
  Grid nesting 21
  Variable-rectangular-cell grid 22
  Non-linear wave-wave interaction 22
  Fast-mode calculation 23
3 CMS-Wave Interface 24
  CMS-Wave files 24
  Components of CMS-Wave interface 29
4 Model Validation 42
  Case 1: Wave shoaling and breaking around an idealized inlet 42
  Case 2: Waves breaking on plane beach 49
  Case 3: Wave runup on impermeable uniform slope 50
  Case 4: Wave diffraction at breakwater and breakwater gap 54
  Case 5: Wave generation in fetch-limited condition 60
  Case 6: Wave generation in bays 61
  Case 7: Large waves at Mouth of Columbia River 67
  Case 8: Wave transformation in fast mode and variable-rectangular-cell grid 74
  Case 9: Wave transformation over complicated bathymetry with strong
nearshore current
79
      Extended Miche formula 81
      Extended Goda formula 84
      Battjes and Jansen formula 87
      Chawla and Kirby formula 90
5 Field Applications 96
  Matagorda Bay 96
  Grays Harbor Entrance 99
  Southeast Oahu coast 106
References 111
Appendix A: CMA-Wave Input File Formats 117

Report Documentation Page

Figures and Tables

Figures

Figure 1. Files used in CMS-Wave simulation 25
Figure 2. CMS-Wave menu 30
Figure 3. Creating a grid 32
Figure 4. Map ->2D Grid Dialog 33
Figure 5. CMS-Wave Cell Attributes dialog 35
Figure 6. Spectral energy dialog for spectra visualization and generation 36
Figure 7. CMS-Wave Model Control dialog 38
Figure 8. Selecting wave spectra 39
Figure 9. Project Explorer with solution read in 40
Figure 10. Idealized inlet and instrument locations 43
Figure 11. Input current fields for Runs 5-8, Runs 9-12, and save stations 46
Figure 12. Measured and calculated current speeds along channel centerline, Runs 5-8 46
Figure 13. Measured and calculated current speeds along channel centerline, Runs 9-12 47
Figure 14. Measured and calculated wave heights along channel centerline, Runs 1-4 47
Figure 15. Measured and calculated wave heights along channel centerline, Runs 5-8 48
Figure 16. Measured and calculated wave heights along channel centerline, Runs 9-12 48
Figure 17. Input current and wave setup fields with save stations for Exp. 4 51
Figure 18. Measured and calculated wave heights, Exp. 4-7 52
Figure 19. Measured and calculated 2% exceedance wave runup 53
Figure 20. Wave diffraction diagram and calculated k’ for a breakwater 55
Figure 21. Calculated wave vectors and K, 0 deg incident wave 55
Figure 22. Calculated wave vectors and K, -45 deg incident wave 56
Figure 23. Calculated wave vectors and K, 45 deg incident wave 56
Figure 24. Wave diffraction diagram and calculated K for a gap, B = 2L 57
Figure 25. Wave diffraction diagram and calculated K for a gap, B = L 58
Figure 26. Calculated wave vectors and K for gap B = 2L, 0 deg incident wave 58
Figure 27. Calculated wave vectors and K for gap B = 2L, -45 deg incident wave 59
Figure 28. Calculated wave vectors and K for gap B = 2L, 45 deg incident wave 59
Figure 29. Comparison of calculated wave generation and SMB curves 61
Figure 30. Modeling grid domain for Rich Passage and wave gauge location 62
Figure 31. Input current and calculated wave fields at 00:40 GMT, 29 March 2005 63
Figure 32. Input current and calculated wave fields at 19:20 GMT, 29 March 2005 64
Figure 33. Model domain and calculated wave field at 12:00 GMT, 27 February 1993 66
Figure 34. Measured and calculated spectra at TSL, 12:00 GMT, 27 February 1993 66
Figure 35. Wave model domain and directional wave data-collection stations 68
Figure 36. Wave and wind data collected at Buoy 46029, sta 4 and 5 68
Figure 37. Calculated waves with and without wind input, 10:00 GMT, 7 August 2005 70
Figure 38. Calculated waves with and without wind input, 18:00 GMT, 9 September 2005 70
Figure 39. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 1, 10:00 GMT, 7 August 2005 70
Figure 40. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 2, 10:00 GMT, 7 August 2005 71
Figure 41. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 3, 10:00 GMT, 7 August 2005 71
Figure 42. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 4, 10:00 GMT, 7 August 2005 71
Figure 43. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 5, 10:00 GMT, 7 August 2005 72
Figure 44. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 1, 00:00 GMT, 30 August 2005 72
Figure 45. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 2, 00:00 GMT, 30 August 2005 72
Figure 46. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 3, 00:00 GMT, 30 August 2005 73
Figure 47. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 4, 00:00 GMT, 30 August 2005 73
Figure 48. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 5, 00:00 GMT, 30 August 2005 73
Figure 49. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 2, 18:00 GMT, 9 September 2005 74
Figure 50. Measured and calculated spectra at sta 3, 18:00 GMT, 9 September 2005 74
Figure 51. CMS-Wave variable-cell grid and five monitoring stations at MCR 76
Figure 52. Calculated wave fields in the standard mode, 12:00 GMT, 14 December 2001 76
Figure 53. Calculated wave fields in the fast mode, 12:00 GMT, 14 December 2001 77
Figure 54. Calculated wave fields in the fast mode, 13:00 GMT, 4 February 2006 77
Figure 55. Bathymetry in meters and locations of wave and current meters 80
Figure 56. Measured current and normalized wave height contours for directional and unidirectional incident waves 80
Figure 57. Calculated wave height contours for directional incident waves without current and with current by the Extended Miche formula with coefficient of 0.14 81
Figure 58. Calculated wave height contours for unidirectional incident waves without current and with current by the Extended Miche formula with coefficient of 0.14 82
Figure 59. Measured versus calculated wave heights for directional and unidirectional incident waves with the Extended Miche formula 83
Figure 60. Normalized wave height comparisons of directional waves along longitudinal and transverse transects with the Extended Miche formula 83
Figure 61. Normalized wave height comparisons of unidirectional waves along longitudinal and transverse transects with the Extended Miche formula 84
Figure 62. Calculated wave height contours for directional incident waves without current and with current by the Extended Goda formula with coefficient of 0.17 85
Figure 63. Calculated wave height contours for unidirectional incident waves without current and with current by the Extended Goda formula with coefficient of 0.17 85
Figure 64. Measured versus calculated wave heights for directional and unidirectional incident waves with the Extended Goda formula 86
Figure 65. Normalized wave height comparisons of directional incident waves along longitudinal and transverse transects with the Extended Goda formula 86
Figure 66. Normalized wave height comparisons of unidirectional incident waves along longitudinal and transverse transects with the Extended Goda formula 87
Figure.67. Calculated wave height contours for directional incident waves without current and with current by the Battjes and Janssen formula 88
Figure 68. Calculated wave height contours for unidirectional waves without current and with currents by the Battjes and Janssen formula 88
Figure 69. Measured versus calculated wave heights for directional and unidirectional incident waves with the Battjes and Janssen formula 89
Figure 70. Normalized wave height comparisons of directional incident waves along longitudinal and transverse transects with the Battjes and Janssen formula 89
Figure 71. Normalized wave height comparisons of unidirectional incident waves along longitudinal and transverse transects with the Battjes and Janssen formula 90
Figure 72. Calculated wave height contours for directional incident waves without current and with current by the Chawla and Kirby formula with  of 0.6 91
Figure 73. Calculated wave height contours for directional incident waves without current and with current by the Chawla and Kirby formula with  of 1.0 91
Figure 74. Calculated wave height contours for unidirectional incident waves without current and with current by the Chawla and Kirby formula with  of 0.6 92
Figure 75. Calculated wave height contours for unidirectional incident waves without current and with current by the Chawla and Kirby formula with  of 1.0 92
Figure 76. Measured versus calculated wave heights for directional and unidirectional incident waves with the Chawla and Kirby formula 93
Figure 77. Normalized wave height comparisons of directional incident waves along longitudinal and transverse transects with the Chawla and Kirby formula 93
Figure 78. Normalized wave height comparisons of unidirectional incident waves along longitudinal and transverse transects with the Chawla and Kirby formula 94
Figure 79. Wind, tides, and wave data-collection stations in Matagorda Bay 97
Figure 80. Matagorda Bay wind and water level data, September-December 2005 98
Figure 81. Directional wave data collected at MBWAV, September-December 2005 98
Figure 82. Calculated Matagorda Bay wave field at 08:00 GMT, 24 October 2005 99
Figure 83. Wave data-collection stations at Grays Harbor 101
Figure 84. Wind and wave data from NDBC 46029 and CDIP 036,
20-31 December 2003
102
Figure 85. Calculated maximum flood current field, 19:00 GMT, 25 December 2003 103
Figure 86. Calculated maximum ebb current field, December 2003 103
Figure 87. Measured and calculated waves at HMB01, 24-28 December 2003 104
Figure 88. Measured and calculated waves at HMB02, 24-28 December 2003 104
Figure 89. Measured and calculated waves at HMB03, 24-28 December 2003 105
Figure 90. Measured and calculated waves at HMB04, 24-28 December 2003 105
Figure 91. Tide and wave data-collection stations and model domain for
SEO/RSM studies
107
Figure 92. Bathymetry grid, and different bottom friction coefficient regions 108
Figure 93. Measured and calculated waves at ADV1 and ADV3, August-September 2005 109
Figure 94. Measured and calculated waves at ADV2, August-September 2005 110

Tables

Table 1. CMS-Wave simulation files 26
Table 2. CMS-Wave Menu Commands 30
Table 3. CMS-Wave Tools 31
Table 4. Spectral Parameters 37
Table 5. Incident wave parameters and current conditions 44
Table 6. Incident wave conditions 49
Table 7. Statistics of measured and calculated wave runup 53
Table 8. Comparison of measured and calculated wave height at wave Gauge LT14 64
Table 9. Coordinates of wave monitoring stations at MCR 67
Table 10. Waves in two extreme storms observed offshore of MCR at Buoy 46029 75
Table 11. Total computer runtime for two storm wave events at MCR 78
Table 12. Calculated wave height and direction, 12:00 GMT, 14 December 2001 78
Table 13. Calculated wave height and direction, 13:00 GMT, 4 February 2006 78
Table 14. Statistical mean relative errors and correlation coefficients 95
Table 15. Comparison of measured and calculated waves at MBWAV 99
Table 16. Coordinates of wave monitoring stations at Grays Harbor 101
Table 17. Coordinates of ADV stations at southeast Oahu 106

Preface

The Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP) is developing and supporting a phase-averaged spectral wave model for inlets and nearshore applications. The model, called CMS-Wave is part of the Coastal Modeling System (CMS) for simulating nearshore waves, flow, sediment transport, and morphology change affecting planning, design, maintenance, and reliability of federal navigation projects. This report describes the theory and numerical implementation of the CMS-Wave interface in the Surface-water Modeling System (SMS), and contains examples to demonstrate use of the model in project applications.

The CIRP is administered at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL) under the Navigation Systems Program for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (HQUSACE). James E. Walker is HQUSACE Navigation Business Line Manager overseeing CIRP. Jeff Lillycrop, CHL, is the Technical Director for the Navigation Systems Program. Dr. Nicholas C. Kraus, Senior Scientists Group (SSG), CHL, is the CIRP Program Manager.

The mission of CIRP is to conduct applied research to improve USACE capabilities to manage federally maintained inlets, which are present on all coasts of the United States, including the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, Pacific Ocean, Great Lakes, and U.S. territories. CIRP objectives are to advance knowledge and provide quantitative predictive tools to (a) make management of federal coastal inlet navigation projects, principally the design, maintenance, and operation of channels and jetties, more effective and reduce the cost of dredging; and (b) preserve the adjacent beaches and estuary in a systems approach that treats the inlet, beaches, and estuary as sediment-sharing components. To achieve these objectives, CIRP is organized in work units conducting research and development in hydrodynamics; sediment transport and morphology change modeling; navigation channels and adjacent beaches; navigation channels and estuaries; inlet structures and scour; laboratory and field investigations; and technology transfer.

This report was prepared by Drs. Lihwa Lin, Coastal Engineering Branch and Zeki Demirbilek, Harbors, Entrances and Structures Branch, both of ERDC-CHL, Vicksburg, MS; Drs. Hajime Mase of Disaster Research Institute at Kyoto University, Japan, and Jinhai Zheng, visiting Scholar at Kyoto University, and Fumihiko Yamada of the Applied Coastal Research Laboratory at Kumamato University, Japan.

Work at CHL was performed under the general supervision of Mr. Edmond J. Russo, Jr., P.E., Chief of Coastal Engineering Branch, Dr. Donald L. Ward, Acting Chief of Coastal Entrances and Structures Branch, and Dr. Rose M. Kress, Chief of Navigation Division. J. Holley Messing, Coastal Engineering Branch, Navigation Division, CHL, typed the equations and format-edited the report. Mr. Thomas W. Richardson was Director, CHL, and Dr. William D. Martin was Deputy Director, CHL, during the study and preparation of this report.

COL Gary E. Johnston was Commander and Executive Director of ERDC. Dr. James R. Houston was Director of ERDC.